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Showing posts from September, 2012

At the movies...

Just worked on this promotional reel last week with my friend, film director Jose Skaf (Check out more of his short films and commercials at http://vimeo.com/50429110 or at the links on the right margin of this journal) and a good time was had by all. At the end is a clip from The Underkraken, a film we shot earlier this year that's in the post production stage right now. I can't wait to share that with you when it's done, so keep stopping by from time to time.
Best, Lance Tooks

Happy Birthday, Narcissa...

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Published by Doubleday Books in October of 2002, my graphic novel Narcissa turns ten years old next week. Here are a few images from and inspired by the book. I'm assembling a new edition in the coming year which will include Notes on Narcissa, a generously illustrated essay describing the creative process behind the 202 page graphic novel.

I enjoyed creating the book a lot and I'll always be grateful to its editor, Deborah Cowell, for making the whole endeavor possible.

 The very first day of Narcissa's release in stores, I received an email of congratulations from Eureka publisher Tom Pomplun, who invited me to contribute to his Graphic Classics series of comics adaptations. I've enjoyed being a part of his team, collaborating with the greatest writers who ever lived.

Narcissa also led me to NBM, whose editor and publisher Terry Nantier encouraged me to pitch him a project that eventually became known as Lucifer's Garden of Verses. The four volume fantasy series …

Dance Fever...

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No words... just recent images from the drawing board.




Lance Tooks

Kid's gotta eat...

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From the vaults, here are a few random bits of twenty-plus year old freelance gigs. I started working in the animation field with Madonna's 1987 film "Who's That Girl" and it led to a hundred odd projects for various New York studios, big and small. Often my assignments were comics related, for example "Magic Man" was an ill-fated animated pitch for Broadcast Arts... the concept was theirs but they sought a particular "look" for their proposal. My approach was 1940's retro, not very well received by the producers, but a style that would return to vogue in cartoons soon after. The protagonist was a young magician who solved crimes with trickery, and with the help of a spunky underage assistant.



Broadcast Arts had a controversial way of gathering visuals for their pitches... they would call several young, hungry artists together and ask them to illustrate their particular "take" on the proposal... on SPEC, which means "for free.&…